Cat-Faced Spider

Scientific Name:

Araneus gemmoides

Type:

Invertebrate

Habitat:

Arid, mountainous states like Nevada, as well as more humid states with lots of vegetation like Washington and Minnesota

Range:

Western to midwestern North America

Status:

No listed status

This species is

NATIVE

to the Truckee Meadows.

Identification:

Cat-faced spiders can vary significantly in color as indicated by photos. The colors range from a light beige color to a darker gray-brown color. Female cat-faced spiders can vary in color depending on whether they are feeding or overwintering. Cat-faced spiders have two bumps and dimple-like features on their round abdomens. Along with other abdomen markings, these features give the impression of a cat face. Female cat-faced spiders are twice as big as males, with the females being up to 25 millimeters long. A female cat-faced spider can produce an egg sack that may be many times larger than her own body.

Fast Facts:

  • Cat-faced spiders (gemmoides) are also known as “monkey-faced spiders.”

  • These spiders are valued by gardeners since they eat many insects that can cause problems in the garden. 

  • Cat-faced spiders are not considered dangerous to humans.

  • Cat-faced spiders are considered orb weaver spiders.

  • Per individual observer reports, cat-faced spiders have been spotted in the Galena area, as well as Spanish Springs in places where there is an abundance of insects, whether it is in a park or near a residence.

Sources:

Contributor(s):

Caron Tayloe (research & content)

Rachel Carroll (edits & page design)


Last Updated:

November 30, 2021, 6:47:05 PM