American Persimmon

Scientific Name:

Diospyros virginiana

Type:

Tree

Habitat:

Dry woodlands and open areas

Range:

Southeastern United States

Status:

No listed status

This species is

NON-NATIVE

to the Truckee Meadows.

Identification:

American persimmons are irregularly shaped, medium sized trees that grow about 60 feet high and can spread 20 to 30 feet wide. Its leaves are green and its bark is grayish in color. Leaves are simple and turn yellow or red in the fall. Persimmon fruits are 1 to 3 inches long, edible, orange and round in shape - typically the fruiting season is between October and February.

Fast Facts:

  • There are over 2,000 varieties of persimmon worldwide, but only two types are commercially available; hachiya and fuyu.

  • American persimmons are also sometimes called possumwood.

  • Persimmon fruit is considered a berry and can take up to 7 years to develop. The fruit has to be cured before consumption, but each fruit contains half an adult’s daily value of vitamin C. Other health benefits include, high in vitamin A, B-carotene, lutein, folic acid, vitamin B-6, thiamin, potassium, manganese, copper, and phosphorus.

  • In Japan, persimmons are often used to make beverages. Unripened fruit is used to brew sake while dried leaves used to make tea.

  • American persimmons are often cultivated and planted in urban environments, such as Idlewild Park in Reno.

Sources:

Contributor(s):

Bridget Mulkerin (research & content)

Max Whealon (research & content)

Alex Shahbazi (edits & page design)

Last Updated:

July 12, 2021, 10:00:10 PM