top of page

Species to Look Out For in the Rosewood Nature Study Area

By: Hogan Irwin


Many places of natural scenery exist in Washoe County. The Rosewood Nature Study Area is located at 6800 Pembroke Dr, Reno, NV 89502 and has many distinct, intriguing, and observable species within its creeks and marshes. The month of May is here and many species become an enjoyable study. Here are a few frequently spotted species to look out for in the Rosewood Nature Study Area.



Yellow-bellied marmot

The Yellow-Bellied Marmot is one of the most active marmots in the Rosewood Nature Study Area during May. This is because their colonies can have up to 15-20 Marmots, and they can live until 15 years old. The encounter chances of Yellow-Bellied Marmots are high in May and higher in June because of this cycle. The fur of the marmot is a mix of shades of brown, yellow, and black, with a white furry patch on the nose making them distinctly recognizable animals. These Marmots eat various foods including bird eggs, insects, grasses, and forbs during the summer. The bird eggs they eat help keep populations of bird species down in the nature study area, playing a role in the natural balance in the study area.



American Coot

Many bird species can be found in the Rosewood Nature Study Area. The American Coot is a great bird for observation during April and May as they are about to leave for their migration cycle. They may be mistaken for being ducks, as they are a distant relative. The most noticeable difference when viewing from the water is a white frontal shield with a red spot covering its head. Males are larger than females if you get a chance to see both. The American Coot is also an omnivore, eating small fish, arthropods, and other small aquatic animals. The sight of the American Coot might be difficult, try to look near banks and creeks to get a better chance at seeing one.



Muskrat

Another species that is both aquatic and land-based is the Muskrat. Muskrats can be seen in the Boynton Slough; it has low water levels and a higher chance of visibility.  Most of their time is spent on the water, with the water levels at a low the Muskrat is a common sight during May. Also, the Muskrat is notably active near dusk and dawn, making a sighting a tad more difficult. Their coat is a mix of medium to dark brown colors. Muskrats feed mostly on cattails and other aquatic vegetation, as well as small animals. Muskrats consume the cattails in the park, if you happen to stumble upon a patch take a glance and you might see a Muskrat.



Yellow-Headed Blackbird

Another bird species that inhabit the Rosewood Nature Study Area is the Yellow-Headed Blackbird, a colorful bird that peaks in observations in May. You can tell a Yellow-Headed Blackbird song by its distinct call that’s harsh and grating, making sounds across the marsh. The Yellow-Headed Blackbird is a permanent natural conservationist, helping keep pesticides and insect populations low during the summer brew of insects. Seeds are mainly scavenged during the rest of the year. A strong cycle like this is what keeps the Yellow-Headed Blackbirds insightful at the Nature Study Area.



Black-Necked Stilt

One of the most unusual bird species that you can find in the Nature Study Area is the Black-Necked Stilt. Mostly seen in April and May, the Black-Necked Stilt has frequent habitats in the flooded plains located all around the Nature Study Area. Look for long pink legs or a black and white puzzle piece on the body and you can easily identify this animal apart from other bird species. This animal slightly forages, feeding on many arthropods and insects in the flooded plains. With the spotting method talked about, you have a good chance to find the Black-Necked Stilt roosting on flooded fields, which gives an understanding of how this species plays a role in this small environment.



Great Blue Heron

Another unique bird species you find in the Rosewood Nature Study Area  is the Great Blue Heron, one of the largest birds you can find in this area. This bird spends a lot of time perched, and spotting it can be easier due to its size. Many things stand out with the Great Blue Heron, such as its copper beak, and shades of gray and azure blue. Observing this animal from any distance, you can point out this bird from many species of birds in the Nature Study Area. Mainly looking for reptiles, arthropods, amphibians, as well as insects, this species is active throughout May. This distinct bird species and many others maintain population control in the Nature Study Area.



Musk Thistle

Blooming in grassland habitats, the Musk thistle is easily spotted with its bright pink bubblegum shade. But guess what? While they may add a pop of color to the landscape, they are actually an invasive weed! Even so, Musk thistle appears to release chemicals into the soil which inhibits the growth of other plants around it. This type of chemical warfare is called allelopathy. So, if you ever see this species at Rosewood Nature Study Area, let someone on our team know, so that our wetland restoration technicians can take steps towards controlling its spread.


Sources via iNaturalist:

Yellow-Bellied Marmot

American Coot

Muskrat

Yellow-Headed Blackbird

Black-Necked Stilt

Great Blue Heron

Musk Thistle

 

About the Author



Born and Raised in the Bay Area, California, Hogan Irwin is currently a student who attends UNR. Hogan studies Atmospheric Science and enjoys observing animals. Most of the choices made on this blog were, frequently inhabited, and recognizable, and how they play a role in the environment in the Rosewood Nature Study Area. Hogan’s favored selection on this blog is the Great Blue Heron.


1 Comment

Rated 0 out of 5 stars.
No ratings yet

Add a rating
Guest
May 12
Rated 5 out of 5 stars.

I've been diving into the world of online platforms recently and found something quite remarkable. The depth of content on this particular platform https://ontop-x.com/ is stunning. It's like a thrilling rollercoaster ride, filled with exciting peaks. The variety is just astounding - it's clear a lot of thought and effort has been put into it. I find myself eagerly waiting for the next updates. Trust me, you don't want to miss out on this!

Like

TMPF Blog

Our Top Posts
Categories

Subscribe to our blog and never miss a new post!

Follow The Parks Foundation
on Social media
  • Twitter
  • Instagram
  • Facebook
bottom of page