Black Willow

Scientific Name:

Salix nigra

Type:

Tree

Habitat:

Stream banks, ditches, low ground wet soil areas

Range:

Varies greatly across North America, reaching Canada to Mexico; often found in the south through much of the eastern and midwestern United States, but it has also been found in the western states such as California and Utah

Status:

No listed status

This species is

NATIVE

to the Truckee Meadows.

Identification:

As a member of the Willow family, this tree grows rapidly up to 60 feet high. Its leaves are known to be lengthy and narrow, reaching up to five inches. The leaves are a green to yellow color, while the bark of the tree is a grey-brown. This beautiful tree is also known to have green to yellow catkins which are cylindrical flowers that often have no petals.

Fast Facts:

  • This tree is often used commercially to produce items such as boxes, furniture, and construction materials. Most of the lumber actually comes from the Mississippi River.

  • The Black Willow is also recognized as a special value to bees across North America due to its pollination and attraction for large numbers of bees.

  • Black willows can be found lining the riverbanks of the Truckee River.

Sources:

Contributor(s):

Crystal Sutton (research & content)

Alex Shahbazi (edits & page design)

Last Updated:

June 30, 2021, 7:19:54 PM