Northern Rubber Boa

Scientific Name:

Charina bottae

Type:

Reptile

Habitat:

Rubber boas can be found in grassland, woodland, and forest habitats

Range:

Northern rubber boas inhabit much of the Western United States and range into southern British Columbia

Status:

Least Concern (IUCN Red List)

This species is

NATIVE

to the Truckee Meadows.

Identification:

Northern rubber boas are comparatively small snakes, averaging only 21 to 26 inches in length. They are two-toned with a uniform tan or olive-brown on their upper side (dorsal side) and a yellow or cream underside (lateral side). These boas are smooth and shiny, with very small eyes and a blunt tail.

Fast Facts:

  • These snakes are nocturnal and prefer colder temperatures than most snakes.

  • They are the smallest members of the boa family (Boidae).

  • Rubber boas form a defensive ball if threatened, pulling covering their head and exposing their tail as a decoy. The tip of their tails are stubby and easily confused for a head.

  • They generally live up to 40 or 50 years in the wild.

  • The genus name Charina means graceful in ancient Greek.

  • The largest threat to Northern rubber boas is over-collection for the pet trade, despite that it is illegal to sell wild-caught boas.

Sources:

Contributor(s):

Aramee Diethelm (research & content)

Alex Shahbazi (edits & page design)

Last Updated:

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